U.S. agents can seize travelers' laptops

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dinowuff
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Post: # 118202Post dinowuff
Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:29 pm

Harry wrote:LMFAO ^ :hysterical:

I can't really find the words to say how retarded this is.... was wondering what I would do if they wanted to take mine of me...its encrypted with a very strong encryption key.....they could submit it to who they like but unless they have cracked SHA-256 they wouldn't be able to read any of my data....I certainly wouldn't give them the encryption key, so I wonder what would happen to me....likely to be thrown in jail until I give them the encryption key...or fined?
Well I can tell you this. After using EnCase on a rather "interesting" individual, I ended up in court testifying. Now all the data was encrypted and I couldn't be sure of anything other than the encrypted volume had tons of photos.

The judge ordered the defendant to give up the password. Guy said he forgot, judge held the guy in contempt of court and sent him off to the county jail until such time as he could remember.

From my testimony, prosecutor got another warrant and searched the entire house - not just the computer. Idiot had printed all the evidence needed to put him in a Pound Me In the ASS penitentiary for the rest of his life.

Now that was state court and when U.S. law held some smidgen of decency and honor. Now days with Bushes Brown Shirts?? Harry if you don't give up the key, you'd probably end up at Git-MO


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OMEN
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Post: # 118204Post OMEN
Thu Aug 07, 2008 2:18 pm

There's a UK law stating that you have to give the police or any such authorities any passwords you have if asked, otherwise an 8 year sentence.

So you have to think whats worse: the encrypted contents or 8 yrs in HM prison.

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Aspman
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Post: # 118207Post Aspman
Thu Aug 07, 2008 2:53 pm

I'm not sure if that law has been enacted yet or is still a green or white paper.
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Egaladeist
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Post: # 118211Post Egaladeist
Thu Aug 07, 2008 3:12 pm

Rapiers buddy :D

Schneier on Security

Police last night told Tony Blair that they need sweeping new powers to counter the terrorist threat, including the right to detain a suspect for up to three months without charge instead of the current 14 days....

They also want to make it a criminal offence for suspects to refuse to cooperate in giving the police full access to computer files by refusing to disclose their encryption keys.

But the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act, which went into effect in 2000, already allows the police to jail people who don't surrender encryption keys:

If intercepted communications are encrypted (encoded and made secret), the act will force the individual to surrender the keys (pin numbers which allow users to decipher encoded data), on pain of jail sentences of up to two years.

http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2 ... and_e.html

more recent:

UK can now demand data decryption on penalty of jail time

New laws going into effect today in the United Kingdom make it a crime to refuse to decrypt almost any encrypted data requested by authorities as part of a criminal or terror investigation. Individuals who are believed to have the cryptographic keys necessary for such decryption will face up to 5 years in prison for failing to comply with police or military orders to hand over either the cryptographic keys, or the data in a decrypted form.

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20 ... -time.html

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Kwiep
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Post: # 118220Post Kwiep
Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:28 pm

Some off those laws are getting damn close to the line where it's no longer "you have nothing to fear if you're not doing something wrong", but "we lock you up, even if you didn't do anything wrong, just to make sure".

At least they're actual laws, unlike what happens to show up on (for example) the CIA bartab every once in a while. Legalising torture is preferable over trying to cover it up. At least then you know you're fucked.
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Morganlefay
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Post: # 118221Post Morganlefay
Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:40 pm

I agree....I think the biggest insult is that they are tromping on our rights and freedoms...and everything our society stands for by pulling this type shite.

and there is nothing we can do about it :(

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