Ahhh, the pain to my...

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Ahhh, the pain to my...

Postby Shippwreck » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:10 pm

...wallet!!!

I've got a small leak in my roof. Its nothing major, but just a steady drip!

So i've called out a roofer to fix it, and he says £360!!! (plus any broken tilesBang Bang@ £3.50 a tile)

Its a right arse because the tile/s that are damaged are right in the corner at the bottom, so he says to get to that one, if done properly you need to take out the whole line, right to the top of the roof and then re-cement them all.

Now i'm confident he's not BS'ing me on the method because two others have said exactly the same, but i wish it wasn't so expensive!!! (BTW those other two never actually sent a bloody quote through, how do they expect to get business if they don't tell me how much it will be!)

So i have another guy coming tomorrow to quote it for a comparison price.

So anyway if you would like to make any donations to the:
"Matt is poor and needs money foundation" then by all means let me know!
(and hayley has a paypal account, hint hint)

:cry:

Apparently the problem has been there for a while, but the guy who owned the house before us was a builder, so he decided that to fix it, he would just throw a load of cement over the damaged tiles! Needless to say that "fix" has now given way.

Oh well i hope the guy tomorrow gives me a slightly cheaper quote...
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Postby Maverick » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:24 pm

I know all about how fun those repairs can be... I just had to have my heating/AC system overhauled and it wasn't cheap at all :( ..... I need to have a leak in the front, outside spigot fixed, but to do so they are going to have to dig into my exterior wall... Oh well... That's just the way it goes sometimes - cost of owning a house...
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Postby |3lack|ce » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:42 pm

Shipp - roofing isn't that tough of a job to do, it's just hot and sweaty, IF your roof isn't steep.

Suggestion: Get a bunch of friends to come over. Promise 'em lunch and beer (but no beer till the job's done). Get a few sheets of plywood (1/2 inch ply is the norm for US houses, some places use 3/4 inch - unsure what measurement units y'all use on wood over there). The plywood is to replace the decking that leaks - use a skil saw (a circular saw) and a jigsaw (reciprocating short bladed saw) to cut out the rotten areas that are leaking in the roof decking and replace 'em with new, or replace the whole sheet as needed. Tile I'm not sure on - never did it. I'm betting roofing tiles have holes predrilled in 'em though for nails or screws to hold 'em in place - so it's a matter of tar papering over your decking, then putting said tiles in place and you're good to go.

Mrs shipp, or shipp's girlfriend or s/o spends her day providing cold beverages (water, iced tea (lol in the UK? yah right. I'll teach ya - it's a novel beverage - see edit at end of post for recipe), or soft drinks) and preparing lunch to fit the number of friends you have present. DO NOT FEED THEM UNTIL THE WORK IS DONE! - and serve up the ice cold beer as well and make an evening of it :)

Anything's gotta be cheaper than 360quid plus parts... down here we roof at $50 a square - the average house roof being 4 squares large.

[edit] Iced Tea, Texas style -

6 regular bags of tea - picot works nicely, as does dar jeeling.

put teabags into the strainer of your coffee maker, run a pot of water through (brewing the tea) - you can also do this on stovetop with a small saucepan - just cook it on medium low and let it concentrate up a bit - then pour over ice into a half gallon pitcher. Add cold water to top off the pitcher. Cold water is crucial - never add hot once the tea is finished or you'll cloud it. Some wives add a very tiny pinch of baking soda to the mix as well to prevent clouding, but I've found it spoils the taste for me.

If you like sweetened tea, load the bottom of the pitcher with about a cup of sugar before you dump the ice in or pour the tea ;)

Lemon to taste

And there you have it - yields 1/2 gallon, keeps in the fridge for about 4 days before it starts going cloudy (cloudy is bad - throw it out and brew fresh ya lazy bum).

Welcome to our primitive American culture :D
[/edit]
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Postby Shippwreck » Tue Apr 04, 2006 10:06 pm

Well, our roofs are made slightly differently.

I pride my self on being able to do most things DIY around the house myself (as long as they don't require specialist tools that cost more than say £20) and i could probably work it out, however the thing is that if there is even a small mistake, water has a funny way of finding it!

I'm just gonna have to suck it up and dig deep![/list]
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Postby Aspman » Wed Apr 05, 2006 9:04 am

I recently helped my girlfriends Dad put the roof on his new bungalow. I just helped at the weekend laying the tiles out on the roof before the forklift had to go back. Fecking hell those things are heavy. I think I had one leg shorter than the other for 2 weeks after it. He says it's not that hard laying tiles but I don't think I'd be very happy fixing it myself. £360 doesn't sound too bad for a tradesman but you should get a couple of other quotes too. Never just go on one figure.

You might want to see if you can source the tiles yourself cheaper. If you can get them at B&Q they let you take back any left overs.
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Postby Shippwreck » Wed Apr 05, 2006 9:19 am

Well, i'm definetely getting more than one quote, in fact i have another guy coming tonight, the only problem with a roof is that it needs to be done ASAP because obviously when it rains it leaks...

I'm not too worried about the cost of new tiles. Theres 2 that will need to be replaced.Bang BangHe said the others may or may not need replacing, it depends on how well they were cemented on in the first place. The problem ones are right on the edge, so that whole line is cemented to the brickwork to form a seal from driving rain. Basically he said that usually you can get them off and its then a case of rinding the old cement off. At absolute worst the edge row is 15 tiles, so the maximum i would have to pay for would be those 15 if none of them come up.

Yeah, you're right about the weight, these things are slightly bigger than an A4 sheet, and nearly an inch thick! Add to that me on a ladder and i think you have a recipe for disaster!!! £360 V broken leg from fall, hmmmm hayley might be annoyed if i'm in a cast for the wedding...

EDIT: |ce, thanks for the recipe, might have to try that, got friends coming over on the weekend...
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Postby |3lack|ce » Wed Apr 05, 2006 12:39 pm

anytime Shipp - round here it's a staple; nearly everyone drinks it when they're doing hard work, or at mealtimes later than noon.
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